• Twitter
  • Google+
  • Lkin
  • YouTube

6 Tips for Writing the Script for a Voice-Over Like a PRO

1. WRITE AS YOU SPEAK 


One of the most popular reading styles is conversational. This may seem normal and perhaps even intuitive, but make no mistake, your words may be interpreted differently from what you imagined at the time of writing. The voice-over actor may see a different dimension from your initial point of view and which you have not thought of. 
So one way to ensure that the voice-over actor has enough information to work is simply to write as if you were speaking aloud to a friend. Writing for the ear allows for much more informal and truly conversational scripts. The writing style will be more natural and better adapted to oral. You may notice that as you adopt this writing style, your texts will improve and become more fluid as you read. They will consist of more recognized words and shorter sentences. 

2. READ WHAT YOU HAVE WRITTEN 

A good text is fluid to read. It comes out of your mouth easily when you read it out loud. So how will you know if this is the case with your script? 
Read it aloud at the rate it should be read. You have to hear it in your ears and not in your head, because there is a big difference. 
These indicators will help you test your text before sending it to the voice-over actor: 
  • Are there any words you tripped over? 
  • Do some sentences seem to drag on? 
  • Did punctuation (or lack of punctuation) bother you? 
If you answered YES to only one of these questions, it is necessary to rework your text. 
If you have difficulty reading it without error, chances are the actor will encounter the same problems. It is then necessary to improve your text before sending it to the actor. 

3. A GOOD SCRIPT HAS GOOD PUNCTUATION

Punctuation can have a considerable impact on the scripting process. 
You can comma-select pauses, but you can also include the word PAUSE or use semicolons or hyphens. 
For example, this sentence: "Most of the time travelers mark their luggage" 
reads very differently when punctuation is added. 
Is it "Most of the time, travelers add a tag to their luggage", or "Time travelers add a tag to their luggage"? 

4. THE VOICE INSTRUCTIONS CORRESPOND TO THE TONE OF YOUR SCRIPT

It is important to ensure that the written description of the voice sound matches the punctuation of your script. You must also ensure that the subject matches the tone indicated. 
For example, if the instructions you have given for the voice is that it should be calm, soft and focused on a serious subject, but your script is full of exclamation points, this can create confusion for the voice-over actor. 
You should also keep your demographic target in mind when writing the script. You don't write a text the same way for a teenage audience as for a professional audience. So, the tone will also be different. 
Be clear, direct and concise in the instructions that accompany the text. If specific instructions are not included, voice-over actors will have to rely on their instincts and experience to decipher how you want the script to be read. 

NOTE: Too many instructions can make reading complicated. Be sure to evaluate the value of each instruction. 

5. HELP THE ACTOR TO PRONOUNCE THE DIFFICULT WORDS 

If your script contains unusual, difficult to pronounce words, acronyms or words specific to your industry, then it is necessary to provide precise pronunciation instructions. 
  • You can send audio clips about the pronunciation of the word. A simple recording with your smartphone can do the job. 
  • You can write the word phonetically in the script. 
Be careful, it is more risky than a recording and perhaps a source of error. 
This will save you time and frustration for you and the voice-over actor, eliminating the process of going back and forth and having to repeat the recording several times (which is time-consuming and can result in additional costs). 
Acronyms, new product names, new terms you may have created and those very specific to your industry must be specified BEFORE registration. Be sure to clearly indicate how to say these words to ensure that you receive the reading you want. 

6. HOW DO I WRITE A SCRIPT FOR A VOICE-OVER IN A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN MY MOTHER TONGUE? 

If you do not know the language in which the text will be recorded, I strongly advise you to hire a professional translator. Online translation tools can sometimes work for simple words or phrases, but it is strongly advised not to trust these tools to translate your entire script… and especially professional texts. 
Also keep in mind that a text intended for a market must be translated by a native speaker into the target language. Thus, a text intended for France, which will be read in French, must be translated by a professional whose mother tongue is French. The subtleties of a complex language like this can only be mastered by native speakers of the language of the destination country. A text translated into French by a Canadian may not sound French correctly. This will be perceptible to the target audience (in this case, French people). 

Always remember that voiceover actors will read the script given to them. The client is responsible for his script. This is normal, once the text has been validated by the customer, the actor will not allow himself to modify it.
So make sure the script reads exactly as you want it to be received by listeners. Hiring a professional to translate or localize your script can help you avoid incorrect expressions and bad translations.


READ MORE:



Contact

Contact Eric Goulard Now